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The Mysteries The Nativity

13 November - 24 November

“biblical beginnings hit the heights” – Remotegoat

 

 

 

In November 2007 Iris theatre presented the first part of Tony Harrison’s Modern Mystery Cycle : The Nativity.

With the World Premiere of new music by Theo Bard and Catherine Kontz.

Through the two weeks of ten performances over 400 people shaw the show. On Tues 13th Nov we had a gala opening where we were honoured with the presence of the Right Rev. Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury; Tony Harrison, writer; Bob Crowley, Director and Designer, National Theatre; Sian Thomas, Actress and many others. The Archbishop returned on an unofficial visit on 24th Nov (our last night) to see the show with his son Pip.

Tony Harrison

Tony Harrison is Britain’s leading film and theatre poet. He has written for the National Theatre in London, the New York Metropolitan Opera and for the BBC and Channel 4 television. He was born in Leeds, England in 1937 and was educated at Leeds Grammar School and Leeds University, where he read Classics and took a diploma in Linguistics. He became the first Northern Arts Literary Fellow (1967-8), a post that he held again in 1976-7, and he was resident dramatist at the National Theatre (1977-8). His work there included adaptations of Molière’s The Misanthrope and Racine’s Phaedra Britannica. His first collection of poems, The Loiners (1970), was awarded the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize in 1972, and his acclaimed version of Aeschylus’s The Oresteia (1981) won him the first European Poetry Translation Prize in 1983. The The Gaze of the Gorgon (1992) won the Whitbread Poetry Award. His adaptation of the English Medieval Mystery Plays cycle was first performed at the National Theatre in 1985. Many of his plays have been staged away from conventional auditoria: The Trackers of Oxyrhyncus was premièred at the ancient stadium at Delphi in 1988; Poetry or Bust was first performed at Salts Mill, Saltaire in Yorkshire in 1993; The Kaisers of Carnuntum premiered at the ancient Roman amphitheatre at Carnuntum in Austria; and The Labours of Herakles was performed on the site of the new theatre at Delphi in Greece in 1995. His translation of Victor Hugo’s The Prince’s Play was performed at the National Theatre in 1996. His films using verse narrative include V, about vandalism, broadcast by Channel 4 television in 1987 and winner of a Royal Television Society Award; Black Daisies for the Bride, winner of the Prix Italia in 1994; and The Blasphemers’ Banquet, screened by the BBC in 1989, an attack on censorship inspired by the Salman Rushdie affair. He co-directed A Maybe Day in Kazakhstan for Channel 4 in 1994 and directed, wrote and narrated The Shadow of Hiroshima, screened by Channel 4 in 1995 on the 50th anniversary of the dropping of the first atom bomb. The published text, The Shadow of Hiroshima and Other Film/Poems (1995), won the Heinemann Award in 1996. He wrote and directed his first feature film Prometheus in 1998. In 1995 he was commissioned by The Guardian newspaper to visit Bosnia and write poems about the war. His most recent collection of poetry is Under the Clock (2005). His Collected Poems, and Collected Film Poetry, were published in 2007. Tony Harrison lives in Newcastle upon Tyne.
 
CastGod, 1st King, 1st Shepherd  – Matthew MellalieuLucifer, Satan, Herod, Mak – Keith HillCain, Noah, Abraham, Joseph, 2nd King, 2nd Shepherd – Mark StarrAdam, Abel, Herod’s Son, 3rd Shepherd – James Merry

Gabriel, Noah’s Wife, 3rd King – Annie Walker

Eve, Issac, Herod’s Messenger – Susan Samuel

Mary, Mak’s Wife – Kathryn Martin

 

Music

 

MD / Piano / Percussion – Candida Caldicot-Bull

Guitar and Song Writer – Theo Bard

Composer – Catherine Kontz

Violin- Julia Lungu

 

Artistic Team

 

Producer/Director – Daniel Winder

Executive Producer – Nigel Winder

Assistant Producer – Chrissy Jay

Lighting Designer – Benjamin Polya

Design Team – Alica Farrow, Katherine Webb, Sean Turner

Costume – Lauren McCarthy

Prop Making – Fiona Ng, Zarah Snowman, Liane Sparks, Carol Mandeville, Amiee Sibun

Choreography  – Lisa Lee